Tribute to Richard Khim

A tribute to our close family friend who was a sincere and kindhearted man. Richard Khim passed away yesterday in Walnut Creek.

Richard moved up North to be near his grandchildren a few years ago. At the community residence where he lived in Danville he and his wife were the only Koreans. Richard as always put his best foot forward and taught art classes to his non-Korean neighbors. Everyone loved Richard and his wife. Richard was a great representative of the good things about being Korean.

Richard Khim (Young Woo) worked as a Korean Radio and Television Anchorman in the Korean American Community. His first radio announcer broadcast was in 1961 for MBC Radio Seoul in Korea.

Richard came to Los Angeles in 1963. On June 12, 1965, he hosted the very first Korean Language Radio program in America, a 30 minute show on KTYM-FM.

Richard was a highly talented animator. In 1965, He started work at Hanna-Barbera Animation Studio doing cartoon background art for the Flintstones, Yogi Bear, Scoobi Doo and Tom Sawyer. Richard's animation work was extensive http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0451637/

In 1974, Richard created “Radio Korea” at KTYM-AM sponsored by Korea Times L.A. and the Command Television Program TV-Han Kook.

In 1991 Richard set up KTAN-TV studio productions at KRCA UHF Channel 62. And, on January 11, 1993 started their MBC syndicated Korean programming.

In 1992, Richard opened Hi-Media Productions to develop programs like the 13 episodes of Reminiscence of Korean Americans presenting stories of Koreans who served the community and were successful in mainstream American society. Richard has captured many valuable stories of Korean and Korean American heritage on tape and film.

Richard documented many Pioneer Koreans in the community. In 2004 Richard and I produced and published the "Susan Ahn Cuddy My Heritage" DVD for Dosan's eldest daughter and my mother.

So many people have watched the cartoons Richard worked on as an animator. His IMDB is impressive.http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0451637/

Flip Cuddy